KNKT: No Institution Posses Lion Air JT 610 CVR Except Us

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  • Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR) of a Lion Air JT610 that crashed into Tanjung Karawang sea is seen inside a special container after it was found under the sea, during a press conference at Tanjung Priok Port in Jakarta, Indonesia, January 14, 2019. The crash was the world's first of a Boeing Co 737 MAX jet and the deadliest of 2018, and the recovery of the aircraft's second black box from the Java Sea north of Jakarta on Monday may provide an account of the last actions of the doomed jet's pilots. ANTARA FOTO/Aprillio Akbar

    Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR) of a Lion Air JT610 that crashed into Tanjung Karawang sea is seen inside a special container after it was found under the sea, during a press conference at Tanjung Priok Port in Jakarta, Indonesia, January 14, 2019. The crash was the world's first of a Boeing Co 737 MAX jet and the deadliest of 2018, and the recovery of the aircraft's second black box from the Java Sea north of Jakarta on Monday may provide an account of the last actions of the doomed jet's pilots. ANTARA FOTO/Aprillio Akbar

    TEMPO.CO, JakartaThe National Transportation Safety Committee (KNKT) head Soerjanto Tjahjono assured that the cockpit voice recorder (CVR) from Lion Air PK-LQP crash last year is only saved in the committee’s server. The data did not link to the internet and was opened for investigation purpose only.

    Soerjanto underlined that no other institution having the recorder of the flight’s final moment before the deadly crash. “Either FAA (the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration), Boeing, or Lion Air do not possess the CVR. Only us who have it,” said Soerjanto in a press conference today, March 21 in the KNKT office, Jakarta.

    The KNKT revealed that the CVR data was different than the recording circulated in the public. “So KNKT considers it as someone or several people’s opinion that is set similar to CVR data,” Soerjanto added.

    Read: Ministry Responds to Published CVR Recording of Crashed Lion Air

    KNKT sub-committee head for air accidents, Nurcahyo Utomo, reiterated that institutions joined in the investigation are allowed to hear the recording, yet prohibited to own the data.

    “Thus far, we still see that information on news reports is not the same as in the CVR, so we cannot say the data is leaked,” said Nurcahyo.

    Earlier, Reuters reported a published cockpit recording that is believed to be from the cockpit voice recorder (CVR) belonging to the ill-fated Lion Air flight JT 610 seconds before crashing on October 29, 2018, killing all 189 people onboard. At the time, Lion Air’s Boeing 737 MAX 8 was piloted by Bhavye Suneja and Indonesian co-pilot Harvino.

    CAESAR AKBAR | BISNIS.COM