Expert Deems Law Revisions as a Return of the New Order

Translator:

Editor:

Petir Garda Bhwana

  • Font:
  • Ukuran Font: - +
  • TEMPO.CO, Jakarta - The government together with the House of Representatives (DPR) has completed revisions on the law overseeing the Corruption Eradication Commission or KPK Law, Criminal Code Law, and the Law on Correctional Facilities.

    The bold and rather hasty move eventually sparked public outcry as the revisions on the three substantial laws are generally considered to limit the basic public rights and weakens attempts to eradicate corruption.

    Corruption eradication has always been one of the most important elements carried in Indonesia’s 1998 reformation which marked the death of the New Order to democracy.

    Head of political studies at the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) Firman Noor, the number of changes of the Law can potentially open doors for the return of the new order.

    “In spirit, it goes against the constitution, the process is far from democratic. As if [the laws] want to take us back to the New Order,” said Firman on Thursday, September 19.

    His fears are arguably evident in the KPK Law No.30/2002 passed by the House of Representatives (DPR) three days prior that has a narrative as if to establish control over the attempts to eradicate corruption and eliminate the anti-graft agency’s independence.

    Meanwhile, the criminal code revision has been agreed to with Articles overseeing the act of corruption as a core crime that will punish corruptors far less compared to what the previous law states. It also eases inmates of corruption cases to file for parole.

    BUDIARTI UTAMI PUTRI | KORAN TEMPO