Jokowi Proposes to Relocate Capital to Kalimantan Island

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Markus Wisnu Murti

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  • President Jokowi bows as a gesture of honor before lawmakers of the House of Representatives (DPR) on the sidelines of a joint assembly of the Regional Representatives Council (DPD) and DPR at the Parliament Complex, in Senayan, Jakarta, Friday, August 16, 2019. TEMPO/M Taufan Rengganis

    President Jokowi bows as a gesture of honor before lawmakers of the House of Representatives (DPR) on the sidelines of a joint assembly of the Regional Representatives Council (DPD) and DPR at the Parliament Complex, in Senayan, Jakarta, Friday, August 16, 2019. TEMPO/M Taufan Rengganis

    TEMPO.CO, JakartaPresident Joko “Jokowi” Widodo has formally asked for public permission and support regarding the planned relocation of the capital city before governmental boards' members and national figures during his state speech on the 74th Indonesian Independence Day at the MPR (People's Consultative Assembly) building, Jakarta, August 16.

    “In this historical event, by pleading Allah’s blessing, I hereby request permission and support from all honorable legislators and national figures, especially all Indonesian people to relocate our state’s capital city to Kalimantan Island,” said the President, who donned a traditional attire of the Sasak tribe.

    However, he did not specifically mention a province or a city for the new capital.

    The capital, he added, is not only a symbol of the nation’s identity but also presents the nation’s development.

    He remarked that the relocation aimed at realizing equal and fair economy in the archipelago.

    “This is for the sake of the vision of Indonesia Maju (Indonesia Progress). Indonesia that eternally lives,” Jokowi concluded.

    Previously, the National Development Agency (Bappenas) head, Bambang Brodjonegoro, said the location of the new capital must be in the center of Indonesia’s territory to represent fairness and accelerate the development in the country's eastern parts.

    The new capital, he said, must have low vulnerability to earthquakes, volcanic activities, tsunamis, flooding, landslides, or land and forest fires. Besides, the administrative hub must boast clean water supplies and free from environmental pollution.

    The new capital city must also be nestled near a developed region that is equipped with infrastructure, such as airport and water resources.

    From the social side, the new capital city must have a minimum potential of social conflict and its vicinities should also have a welcoming nature towards newcomers. 

    ANTARA