Mink carcasses are disposed of at a farm in Farre in the southern part of Jutland, Denmark October 21, 2020. Mink in all of the country are to be put down, the Danish prime minister said at a news conference November 4th. The animals in some of Denmark's fur farms contain a novel coronavirus mutation. Ritzau Scanpix/Mette Moerk via REUTERS

Culled minks are pictured at Hans Henrik Jeppesen's farm near Soroe, after government's decision to cull his entire herd due to coronavirus disease (COVID-19), Denmark November 5, 2020. Denmark's State Serum Institute, which deals with infectious diseases, has found mink-related versions of coronavirus in 214 people since June, according to a report on its website updated on Nov. 5. REUTERS/Jacob Gronholt-Pedersen

A man handles culled mink at the farm of Henrik Nordgaard Hansen and Ann-Mona Kulsoe Larsen near Naestved, Denmark, November 6, 2020. One strain of the mutated coronavirus, which has prompted Denmark to cull its entire herd of mink, has however only been found in 12 people and on five mink farms so far. Ritzau Scanpix/Mads Claus Rasmussen via REUTERS.

Dead minks are seen at Sydvestjysk Pelscenter where they are pelted, in Varde, Denmark, November 7, 2020. The mink population of up to 17 million will be culled after a mutation of the coronavirus found in the animals spread to humans. John Randeris/Ritzau Scanpix/via REUTERS

People push a cart with culled mink at the farm of Henrik Nordgaard Hansen and Ann-Mona Kulsoe Larsen near Naestved, Denmark, November 6, 2020. Denmark has raised concerns that the mutations could affect the potential efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines in development. Ritzau Scanpix/Mads Claus Rasmussen via REUTERS.

People transport culled mink of the farm of Henrik Nordgaard Hansen and Ann-Mona Kulsoe Larsen near Naestved, Denmark, November 6, 2020. Ritzau Scanpix/Mads Claus Rasmussen via REUTERS.