An adult female jaguar named Amanaci receives stem cell treatment on her paws after burn injuries during a fire in Pantanal, at NGO Nex Institute in Corumba de Goias, Goias State, Brazil, September 19, 2020. The spotted female, named Amanaci, is one of countless victims of the worst wildfires ever recorded in Brazil's Pantanal, the world's largest wetland. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Manager of BIO CELL and veterinarian Patricia Malard applies stem cell treatment on the paws of an adult female jaguar named Amanaci who sustained burn injuries from a fire in Pantanal, at NGO Nex Institute in Corumba de Goias, Goias State, Brazil, September 19, 2020. Amanaci was one of the lucky ones. Rescued by volunteers, she was brought to a farm in the state of Goias run by an NGO dedicated to protecting endangered wild cats. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

A caregiver shows burn wounds on the paws of an adult female jaguar named Amanaci sustained after a fire in Pantanal, as the animal undergoes a stem cell treatment, at NGO Nex Institute in Corumba de Goias, Goias State, Brazil, September 19, 2020. The caged jaguar, hit by a tranquilizer dart, rises with a pained growl on to her bandaged, burned paws. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Manager of BIO CELL and veterinarian Patricia Malard applies stem cell treatment on the paws of an adult female jaguar named Amanaci who sustained burn injuries from a fire in Pantanal, at NGO Nex Institute in Corumba de Goias, Goias State, Brazil, September 19, 2020. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

An adult male jaguar named Ousado receives treatment for burn injuries on his paws after a fire in Pantanal, at NGO Nex Institute in Corumba de Goias, Goias State, Brazil, September 19, 2020. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

An adult male jaguar named Ousado rests during treatment for burn injuries on his paws after a fire in Pantanal, at NGO Nex Institute in Corumba de Goias, Goias State, Brazil, September 19, 2020. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino