Foreign prisoners, suspected of being part of the Islamic State, lie in a prison cell in Hasaka, Syria, January 7, 2020. n northeastern Syria, prisons and detention camps hold thousands of men, women and children whose lives are in limbo nearly a year after the final defeat of Islamic State to which they once belonged. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic

Prisoners from Iraq and Syria, suspected of being part of the Islamic State, spend time in a prison's outside grounds in Hasaka, Syria, January 11, 2020. he area around Qamishli city is mainly controlled by Kurdish fighters who helped defeat the Islamist militant group. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic

Prisoners from Iraq and Syria, suspected of being part of the Islamic State, sit inside a prison cell in Hasaka, Syria, January 11, 2020. Europeans comprise a fifth of the roughly 10,000 Islamic State fighters held captive in Syria by Kurdish militias. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic

Abed El-Hamed Atiya, an Iraqi prisoner, suspected of being part of the Islamic State, sits next to a picture he drew inside a prison in Hasaka, Syria, January 7, 2020. Atiya is kept apart from other prisoners, some of whom strongly object to his art. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic

Foreign prisoners, suspected of being part of the Islamic State, pray inside a prison hospital in Hasaka, Syria, January 7, 2020. Kurdish officials say they lack the resources to properly detain, investigate and prosecute the large number of prisoners as well as their families in camps. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic

Prisoners suspected of being part of the Islamic State, lie inside a prison cell in Hasaka, Syria, January 7, 2020. Beyond the prisons, thousands of mostly woman and children are detained in camps in the area. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic