Tuesday, 12 November 2019

Graduate student Bradley Arrington uses a steel hammer and chisel to remove diseased corals on a trip to inspect corals affected by Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease (SCTLD) near the University of the Virgin Islands campus in St Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands, May 15, 2019. Hower and her colleagues are on a race against time to find what causes a disease dubbed Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Marilyn Brandt, a research associate professor at the University of the Virgin Islands' Center for Marine and Environmental Studies, swims past a Pillar coral (Dendrogyra cylindricus) showing tissue loss caused by Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease (SCTLD) near the University of the Virgin Islands campus in St Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands, May 17, 2019. In just five years, it has wreaked devastation on the fragile coral ecosystems that are already at risk of extinction from the effects of climate change. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Kevin Macaulay, research assistant at Nova Southeastern University, applies an antibiotic ointment to the surface of an Orbicella faveolata (Mountainous Star Coral) affected by Stony Tissue Loss Disease (SCTLD) on a dive near Key West, Florida, U.S. September 8, 2019. Of 40 reef sites in the Florida Keys monitored by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, 38 are already affected. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Graduate student Jeanne Bloomberg measures a distance with Bradley Arrington on a dive to inspect corals affected by Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease (SCTLD) near the University of the Virgin Islands campus in St Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands, May 16, 2019. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Research technician, Danielle Lasseigne (R), works with graduate students Kathryn Cableigh (L) and Bradley Arrington to remove corals afflicted by Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease (SCTLD) on a dive near the University of the Virgin Islands campus in St Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands, May 15, 2019. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Marilyn Brandt (R), a research associate professor at the University of the Virgin Islands' Center for Marine and Environmental Studies, makes a symbol with graduate students (L-R) Kathryn Cableigh, Jeanne Bloomberg, and Bradley Arrington on a dive to inspect coral affected by Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease (SCTLD) at the University of the Virgin Islands campus in St Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands, May 16, 2019. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson