The first ever photo of a black hole, taken using a global network of telescopes, conducted by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) project, to gain insight into celestial objects with gravitational fields so strong that no matter or light can escape, is shown in this handout released April 10, 2019. "Black holes have captivated the imaginations of scientists and the public for decades." Event Horizon Telescope (EHT)/National Science Foundation/Handout via REUTERS

The first ever photo of a black hole, taken using a global network of telescopes, conducted by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) project, to gain insight into celestial objects with gravitational fields so strong that no matter or light can escape, is shown in this handout released April 10, 2019. Black holes are dense celestial entities with gravitational fields so strong no light or matter can escape, which makes viewing them extremely difficult. Event Horizon Telescope (EHT)/National Science Foundation/Handout via REUTERS

The first ever photo of a black hole, taken using a global network of telescopes, conducted by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) project, to gain insight into celestial objects with gravitational fields so strong that no matter or light can escape, is shown in this handout released April 10, 2019. Scientists combined the power of eight Earth-based telescopes from around the world to capture the picture. Event Horizon Telescope (EHT)/National Science Foundation/Handout via REUTERS

The first ever photo of a black hole, taken using a global network of telescopes, conducted by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) project, to gain insight into celestial objects with gravitational fields so strong that no matter or light can escape, is shown in this handout released April 10, 2019. Event Horizon Telescope (EHT)/National Science Foundation/Handout via REUTERS