Thursday, 21 November 2019

Participants sit inside coffins during a "living funeral" event as part of a "dying well" programme, in Seoul, South Korea, October 31, 2019. More than 25,000 people have participated in mass "living funeral" services at Hyowon Healing Center since it opened in 2012, hoping to improve their lives by simulating their deaths. REUTERS/Heo Ran

A participant poses for a funeral portrait during a "living funeral" event as part of a "dying well" programme, in Seoul, South Korea, October 31, 2019. Dozens took part in the event, from teenagers to retirees, donning shrouds, taking funeral portraits, penning their last testaments, and lying in a closed coffin for around 10 minutes. REUTERS/Heo Ran

A participant poses for a funeral portrait during a "living funeral" event as part of a "dying well" programme, in Seoul, South Korea, October 31, 2019. South Korea ranks 33 out of 40 countries surveyed in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's Better Life Index. REUTERS/Heo Ran

Participants stand next to coffins during a "living funeral" event as part of a "dying well" programme, in Seoul, South Korea, October 31, 2019. Funeral company Hyowon began offering the living funerals to help people appreciate their lives, and seek forgiveness and reconciliation with family and friends, said Jeong Yong-mun, who heads the healing centre. REUTERS/Heo Ran

Participants get into coffins during a "living funeral" event as part of a "dying well" programme, in Seoul, South Korea, October 31, 2019. Dozens took part in the event, from teenagers to retirees, donning shrouds, taking funeral portraits, penning their last testaments, and lying in a closed coffin for around 10 minutes. REUTERS/Heo Ran

Participants sit inside coffins during a "living funeral" event as part of a "dying well" programme, in Seoul, South Korea, October 31, 2019. REUTERS/Heo Ran