Thursday, 14 November 2019

Doctor Padet Siridumrong plays with his patient, two-and-a-half year-old Thai elephant Fah Jam, crippled by wire snares in 2017, before handing her over to Thai national park after two years of treatment in Nong Nooch Tropical Garden in Pattaya, Thailand September 12, 2019. A three-year-old baby elephant with a prosthetic foot will be transferred to a new home in northern Thailand. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun

Doctor Padet Siridumrong puts prosthetic foot on his patient, two-and-a-half year-old Thai elephant Fah Jam, crippled by wire snares in 2017, before handing her over to Thai national park after two years of treatment in Nong Nooch Tropical Garden in Pattaya, Thailand September 12, 2019. The elephant, called Fa Jam, was caught in a trap in 2016 and was later rescued and fitted with a prosthetic foot. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun

Doctor Padet Siridumrong plays with his patient, two-and-a-half year-old Thai elephant Fah Jam, crippled by wire snares in 2017, before handing her over to Thai national park after two years of treatment in Nong Nooch Tropical Garden in Pattaya, Thailand September 12, 2019. Fa Jam will be transported to the Thai Elephant Conservation Centre in Lampang province, a 16 hour drive in northern Thailand where she will live with other injured elephants. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun

Kampon Tansacha, Managing Director of Nong Nooch Tropical Garden stands near a two-and-a-half year-old Thai elephant Fah Jam, crippled by wire snares in 2017, before handing her over to Thai national park after two years of treatment in the garden in Pattaya, Thailand September 12, 2019. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun

Kampon Tansacha, Managing Director of Nong Nooch Tropical Garden and Doctor Padet Siridumrong stand near a two-and-a-half year-old Thai elephant Fah Jam, crippled by wire snares in 2017, before handing her over to Thai national park after two years of treatment in the garden in Pattaya, Thailand September 12, 2019. REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun