Balazs Kerulo, chief engineer of LIFT aircraft, demonstrates a "Hexa" personal drone craft during an event in Lago Vista, Texas, U.S., June 3, 2019. A Texas company aims to sell short recreational flights later this year in a one-seater electric aircraft it has designed that can be controlled by a joystick without requiring a pilot's license. REUTERS/Amanda Voisard

Balazs Kerulo, chief engineer of LIFT aircraft, demonstrates a "Hexa" personal drone craft during an event in Lago Vista, Texas, U.S., June 3, 2019. LIFT Aircraft may end up being the first to sell pleasure rides in such a vehicle, in part because it says the aircraft is light enough to be considered an "ultralight" vehicle by the Federal Aviation Authority. REUTERS/Amanda Voisard

LIFT aircraft employees remove batteries from a "Hexa" personal drone craft, following a demonstration during an event in Lago Vista, Texas, U.S., June 3, 2019. Customers would first spend time learning the controls in a simulator before climbing into a Hexa to fly for up to 15 minutes, the maximum amount of time that can be safely allowed by the batteries. REUTERS/Amanda Voisard

LIFT aircraft employees look on during a demonstration of a "Hexa" personal drone craft during an event in Lago Vista, Texas, U.S., June 3, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Voisard

Balazs Kerulo, chief engineer of LIFT aircraft, demonstrates a "Hexa" personal drone craft during an event in Lago Vista, Texas, U.S., June 3, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Voisard

Balazs Kerulo, chief engineer of LIFT aircraft, demonstrates a "Hexa" personal drone craft during an event in Lago Vista, Texas, U.S., June 3, 2019. REUTERS/Amanda Voisard