Bikers ride a Bousouzoku motorbike in Yamanashi, west of Tokyo, Japan, January 3, 2016. This Japanese motorcycle subculture dated back to the 1950s and regularly chafes with the police because of their provocative traffic behaviour and bike customising, that is often deemed illegal. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

Policemen keep an eye on Bousouzoku bikers as they wait at the Dangouzaka rest stop in Yamanashi, west of Tokyo, Japan, January 3, 2016. Police on Sunday halted a group of about two dozen Bousouzoku bikers who paraded their noisy motorcycles during an annual New Year outing in the Mount Fuji region. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

Policemen hand out penalties to Bousouzoku bikers for illegal customisation of their motorcycles at the Dangouzaka rest stop in Yamanashi, west of Tokyo, Japan, January 3, 2016. This Japanese motorcycle subculture dates back in the 1950s and regularly chafes with the police because of their provocative traffic behaviour and bike customising, that is often deemed illegal. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

A woman is reflected in the rear mirror of a Bousouzoku motorbike at the Dangouzaka rest stop in Yamanashi, west of Tokyo, Japan, January 3, 2016. Police on Sunday halted a group of about two dozen Bousouzoku bikers who paraded their noisy motorcycles during an annual New Year outing in the Mount Fuji region. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

Policemen inspect a customised Bousouzoku style motorcycle at the Dangouzaka rest stop in Yamanashi, west of Tokyo, Japan, January 3, 2016. This Japanese motorcycle subculture dates back in the 1950s and regularly chafes with the police because of their provocative traffic behaviour and bike customising, that is often deemed illegal. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

Policemen stop a Bousouzoku biker at the Dangouzaka rest stop in Yamanashi, west of Tokyo, Japan, January 3, 2016. Police on Sunday halted a group of about two dozen Bousouzoku bikers who paraded their noisy motorcycles during an annual New Year outing in the Mount Fuji region. REUTERS/Thomas Peter