Hotspots in Sumatra Rapidly Spike After Rainfall

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  • Smoke haze from forest fires seen in Padang, West Sumatra, September 17,2014. ANTARA/Iggoy el Fitra

    Smoke haze from forest fires seen in Padang, West Sumatra, September 17,2014. ANTARA/Iggoy el Fitra

    TEMPO.CO, Padang-Rainfall occurring in most regions in Sumatra for the past few days were not sufficient to reduce forest fire in the area. The number of hotspots previously reduced were up again this morning.

    According to Global Atmosphere Monitor Station (GAW) of Bukit Kototabang to the Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency (BMKG) on Tuesday, November 3, 200-hotspots have occurred, where it only had 7-hotspots a day before.

    The most hotspots occurred in South Sumatra with 165-hotspots, followed by Bangka Belitung Island with 16-hotspots. “This is based on today’s hotpots and haze recorded at 6am,” Observation and Information Station GAW BMKG staff Albert Nahas.

    Seven hotspots have also occurred in Jambi and 12 in Lampung. Luckily, the increase number of hotspots were followed by an increase in rain in Sumatra, particularly in the northern and central region thus causing to reduce haze.

    In West Sumatra, said Albert, hotspots are still seen in the southern area, including South Solok and Dharmasraya, that are predicted to still be affected by haze, although not as significant as the previous week,” said Albert.

    ANDRI EL FARUQI