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Activist Comments on Ahok`s Career after Presidential Election
Basuki Tjahaja Purnama, better known as Ahok.
Wednesday, 06 December, 2017 | 08:16 WIB
Activist Comments on Ahok`s Career after Presidential Election

TEMPO.CO, Jakarta - Basuki Tjahaja Purnama’s (Ahok) high electability rating in the latest survey by pollster Indo Barometer has sparked a lot of rumors that the former Jakarta Governor will return to politics after the 2019 presidential election.

Being jailed and will only get out in mid-2019, Ahok garnered 3.3 percent electability rating from 1200 respondents from 34 provinces in the survey conducted on November 15-23. Meanwhile, Jakarta Governor Anies Baswedan, who saw off Ahok in the 2017 regional election, has a better electability rating with 3.6 percent.

In the fifth position, below Ahok, is the National Armed Forces (TNI) with 3.2 percent. President Joko Widodo and Gerindra Party chairman Prabowo Subianto ranked first and second in the survey.

Jack Lapian, a supporter of Ahok in the 2017 Jakarta and founder of BTP (Basuki Tjahaja Purnama) Network, said that Ahok would have a better career if he stays away from politics and avoiding the lure of becoming a party functionary, local head or government official after the 2019 presidential election. Ahok is currently jailed for 2 years for blasphemy.

“In my opinion, Pak BTP [will have a better career] at the UN or international organizations after he gets out of jail,” Jack Lapian told Tempo on Monday.

Jack, however, said that it does not necessarily mean that Ahok is no longer suitable for a position in Indonesian politics.

“There will be time for Pak BTP (Ahok) to return like Sri Mulyani [current Finance Minister who previously served as World Bank Managing Director],” Jack Lapian said on Ahok’s career after the 2019 election.

 

Jobpie Sugiharto

 



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