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Monday, 11 December 2017 | 15:46
Thousands of Cops Deployed to Secure Pro - Palestine Rally Over 2,000 cops were deployed during a pro-Palestine rally launched in
front of the United States Embassy today in Jakarta
Monday, 11 December 2017 | 15:14
DPR Holds Meeting to Discuss Setya Novanto`s Resignation Letter The DPR held a meeting to discuss discuss the resignation of inactive DPR
Speaker Setya Novanto and the appointment of the new DPR Speaker.
Tempo Film Festival 2017: From Tirang to the Sumbawa Valley  
One of the scenes at Turah film. YouTube.com
Tuesday, 05 December, 2017 | 15:10 WIB
Tempo Film Festival 2017: From Tirang to the Sumbawa Valley  

TEMPO.CO, Jakarta - Dressed in a traditional batik shirt, brown pants, and a gray flat cap, Slamet Ambari went on stage to accept his Tempo Film Festival award at the XXI Epicentrum movie theater in Kuningan, South Jakarta, last Monday. Slamet, who played Jadag in the film Turah, was chosen as Tempo’s Best Actor of 2017. "Is this real? My God, I’m grateful to Ifa and Wisnu," he said. "I’m earnest in my acting, but since this is being given to me, I accept. Thank you," said Slamet in a thick Javanese-Tegal accent when receiving the award.

The film Turah, directed by Wicaksono Wisnu Legowo, dissects the reality of poverty in Kampung Tirang. Slamet, as Jadag, impressively acted the part of a frustrated character. Jagad, tough and explosive, is infuriated by the village’s oppressive landlord and intractable poverty. The 53-year-old is able to breathe full life to Jadag’s character and to embody the hardened character of the people living in the peripheries of Tegal. 

Tempo has had an annual tradition of selecting the best film and best-supporting categories since 2011. As in previous years, we have selected Tempo’s choice for best film, director, screenwriter, actor and actress, as well as best supporting actor and actress. This year we added the best child actor category.

In 2017, we observed many outstanding child actors in several top films. We felt that having child actors compete against adults in the same category would be unfair, which was why we decided on a separate category this year. 

The films we chose did not have to be previously screened at commercial film theatres. We chose from the entire range of films released between December 2016 and October 2017, as long as the film had been shown in public, such as at festivals or community events. These films did not have to be approved of by the government’s censorship agency. We selected, discussed, and debated the films before choosing the winners. 

We did not choose the winners on our own. In addition to members of Tempo’s editorial staff who usually cover, write and edit pieces on film, we invited several outside critics. This time, we invited author and Jakarta Arts Institute rector Seno Gumira Ajidarma, and Adrian Jonathan Pasaribu, who is a film critic and runs Cinema Poetica-a platform that offers reviews of Indonesian films. In addition to being a jury member, Seno was invited to write a piece on our best film, while Adrian was asked to review Tempo’s choice for best screenplay for this special report.

Read the full article in this week's edition of Tempo English Magazine

 



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