Govt Assures Law on Terrorism will not become a Political Tool

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  • Indonesian Coordinating Minister for Politics, Security and Law Wiranto, center left, accompanied by Information Minister Rudiantara, right, gestures as he speaks during a press conference announcing a presidential decree to amend an existing law regulating mass organization in Jakarta, July 12, 2017. AP

    Indonesian Coordinating Minister for Politics, Security and Law Wiranto, center left, accompanied by Information Minister Rudiantara, right, gestures as he speaks during a press conference announcing a presidential decree to amend an existing law regulating mass organization in Jakarta, July 12, 2017. AP

    TEMPO.CO, Jakarta - Coordinating Minister for Political, Legal, and Security Affairs Wiranto said that the ratification of the Law on Terrorism, known more as RUU Terorisme, will not be abused as a political tool.

    He maintained that it is purely to provide a legal protection for law enforcers upon handling cases related to terrorism.

    “The anti-terrorism law will have many activities and cracks that can be entered, which it initially would not be able to be penetrated. But do believe that it will not harm the interest of the people, and will not be used as a political tool,” said Wiranto after meeting with President Jokowi’s supporting political parties on Monday, May 14.

    Read: ISKA Criticizes Politicization on Bombings in Surabaya

    Wiranto maintained that the law on terrorism is mainly to equip law enforcers with the authority and legal protection that are essentially needed, which can drive authorities to be persistent in handling terrorism.

    Furthermore, Wiranto explained that this law will provide a space for law enforcers to oversight preventive actions quickly. “The law is phrased to be that way and it is basically the spirit of the law. We can observe [terrorism] since its early inception and we can deal with it,” said Wiranto.

    The Law on Terrorism is currently still being completed by the House of Representatives (DPR) which is hampered by the fact that the government and the DPR have yet agreed upon the definition of terrorism.

    MUHAMMAD HENDARTYO