Obama to End NSA Data Collecting Program

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  • The National Security Agency's Utah Data Center in Bluffdale, Utah. AP/Rick Bowmer, File

    The National Security Agency's Utah Data Center in Bluffdale, Utah. AP/Rick Bowmer, File

    TEMPO.CO, Washington - The White House is preparing to make major changes in telecommunication metadata collecting activity by the National Security Agency (NSA) following heavy criticism towards the program regarding privacy of citizens.

    According to New York Times, last Monday evening, United States President Barack Obama will announce a new proposal to reduce one of the most controversial national security surveillance program.

    The proposal, which will be submitted to the United States Congress, will end telecommunication data collection by the NSA, making it White House's most significant effort in handling the global outcry triggered by the secret documents leaked by Edward Snowden.

    The metadata collection program is one of the secret surveillance programs approved by former president George W. Bush after the 9/11 tragedy that killed 3,000 people.

    The policy was based under the recommendation from the Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technologies established by Obama.

    As part of the proposal, the Obama administration will seek authorization from the Foreign Surveillance Court (FISC) to renew the NSA program for at least a 90-day cycle.

    NEW YORK TIMES | TIME | ABDUL MANAN