UGM Pledges to Increase GeNose Accuracy Rate to Prevent False Negative

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Petir Garda Bhwana

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  • Commuters wearing protective masks blow a plastic bag as they take their air-sample to be tested using GeNose C19 (GeNose), a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) detection tool, at a train station in Jakarta, February 3, 2021. The breathalyzer, known as GeNose, was developed by the University of Gadjah Mada (UGM), which says it detects the reaction between the coronavirus and body tissue in the respiratory tract with at least 95% accuracy. REUTERS/Ajeng Dinar Ulfiana

    Commuters wearing protective masks blow a plastic bag as they take their air-sample to be tested using GeNose C19 (GeNose), a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) detection tool, at a train station in Jakarta, February 3, 2021. The breathalyzer, known as GeNose, was developed by the University of Gadjah Mada (UGM), which says it detects the reaction between the coronavirus and body tissue in the respiratory tract with at least 95% accuracy. REUTERS/Ajeng Dinar Ulfiana

    TEMPO.CO, JakartaGadjah Mada University (UGM) was determined to increase the accuracy rate of its Covid-19 screening tool dubbed GeNose to anticipate false-negative results.

    The state university claimed that the accuracy rate of its coronavirus detector reached 90 percent.

    “We continue to strive to improve the accuracy so that we can drop the so-called false negatives and false positives results as low as possible so that its use can be more optimal,” said UGM Vice Rector Paripurna Sugarda when met at the office of the Coordinating Ministry for Maritime Affairs and Investment in Central Jakarta, Tuesday evening, February 23.

    Paripurna said the plan was in line with the increasing demand from transportation modes, especially trains. As of date, about 62 detectors have been already used at eight stations. The target destination will be expanded to 44 stations.

    In the near future, GeNose will be used as an alternative medical test of Covid-19 at ports and airports. Paripurna acknowledged that the request was a challenge for the university. Besides the accuracy, the challenges include accelerating equipment procurement. “We will soon propose a business plan that is nearly perfect and affordable so that we can realize our needs,” he said.

    Also Read: INACA Asks Govt to Allow GeNose for Air Passengers

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