FAA Lifts Boeing 737 Max Ban; Lion Air Waits for Further Instruction

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  • An employee works near a Boeing 737 Max aircraft at Boeing's 737 Max production facility in Renton, Washington, U.S. December 16, 2019. Boeing will halt production of the 737 MAX in January, without any layoffs, as the grounding of the planemaker's best-selling jet after two deadly crashes looks to extend well into 2020. REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson

    An employee works near a Boeing 737 Max aircraft at Boeing's 737 Max production facility in Renton, Washington, U.S. December 16, 2019. Boeing will halt production of the 737 MAX in January, without any layoffs, as the grounding of the planemaker's best-selling jet after two deadly crashes looks to extend well into 2020. REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson

    TEMPO.CO, JakartaIndonesian low-cost air carrier Lion Air announced that it will wait for an official instruction before reintroducing its Boeing 737 Max fleet after the United States’ Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) lifted the 20-month ban imposed on the aircraft.

    “We, as operators or customers of the aircraft, will wait for a decision to be made by the aircraft producer and regulators,” said Danang Mandala Prihantoro, Corporate Communications Strategic of Lion Air Group, on November 19. 

    Lion Air has 10 fleets of Boeing 747 Max 8. The ten jets are all grounded following two tragic accidents that saw Ethiopian Airlines ET 320 and Lion Air JT 610 fall from the sky due to technical setbacks in the aircraft’s software within 5-months in 2018 and 2019.

    Reuters reported today that the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration chief Steve Dickson signed an order lifting the longest jet grounding in commercial aviation history. The agency released final details of the software, system, and training upgrades Boeing and airlines must complete before carrying passengers.

    When flights resume, Boeing will be running a 24-hour war room to monitor all Boeing 737 Max flights for potential problems, from stuck landing gear to health emergencies, three people familiar with the matter said.

    Read: FAA Urged to Mandate Safety Management Systems for Boeing

    FRANCISCA CHRISTY ROSANA | REUTERS