Bali to Adopt New Normal Protocols Starting June 6

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Laila Afifa

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  • A woman gestures as she waits for tourists at Puseh Temple of Batuan Village in Gianyar, Bali, Indonesia, February 5, 2020. Picture taken February 5, 2020. Indonesia stands to lose $4 billion in earnings from tourism if its worst-case scenario materialises and travel from China is disrupted for the whole year by a virus epidemic, the tourism minister said on Thursday. REUTERS/Johannes P. Christo

    A woman gestures as she waits for tourists at Puseh Temple of Batuan Village in Gianyar, Bali, Indonesia, February 5, 2020. Picture taken February 5, 2020. Indonesia stands to lose $4 billion in earnings from tourism if its worst-case scenario materialises and travel from China is disrupted for the whole year by a virus epidemic, the tourism minister said on Thursday. REUTERS/Johannes P. Christo

    TEMPO.CO, Denpasar - The Bali provincial administration is determined to implement the new normal protocols in the governmental offices starting Friday, June 5. Governor Wayan Koster issued the decision via a circular No. 730/9899/MP/BKD.

    “[It will be applied] in governmental offices only. For sectors of education, industry or trade, and others, it (the protocols) will not be implemented yet,” said Koster in his official residence today, June 3.

    Koster deemed the new normal era as a new way of living and admitted that his province is not among 102 regions recommended by the Covid-19 task force to immediately adopt the protocols.

    There are six points underlined on the gubernatorial circular. One of them is that leaders of institutions or work units are mandated to establish its Covid-19 task force in their office areas.

    The state officials are also obliged to ensure their health condition before leaving for work, and the public services must be under health protocols.

    “People who are not wearing face masks will not be served,” Koster said, calling on regents or mayors, and institutional chairpersons to adapt the new normal protocol to their respective conditions.

    As for Bali's tourism sector, Koster asserted that his administration will not reopen tourist sites yet as studies are still being afoot. “Because it poses high risks. International flights have not been reopened, too, let alone tourism.”

    MADE ARGAWA