Thursday, 27 February 2020

59 Supreme Court Judges Die in 2019; MA Chief Laments Over BPJS

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Markus Wisnu Murti

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  • Supreme Court (MA) Chief Justice Muhammad Hatta Ali (purple shirt), accompanied by his aides, delivers a year-end performance reflection speech at his office on Friday, December 27, 2019. TEMPO/Dewi Nurita

    Supreme Court (MA) Chief Justice Muhammad Hatta Ali (purple shirt), accompanied by his aides, delivers a year-end performance reflection speech at his office on Friday, December 27, 2019. TEMPO/Dewi Nurita

    TEMPO.CO, Jakarta - Supreme Court (MA) Chief Justice Muhammad Hatta Ali said his institution had lost a significant number of its members following the passing of 59 supreme court judges in 2019: 23 religious court judges, 34 general court judges, and two supreme court justices. 

    “Most of them died due to health issues. I offer my condolences since the Supreme Court understands that the tasks, responsibilities, pressures, and risks faced by its court apparatus, especially judges, are getting ever more arduous,” said Hatta at his office on Friday, December 27.

    According to the Chief Justice, there are many judges facing difficulties in applying for medical checks as they must use the BPJS, a state-run healthcare service, and due to the fact that many do not own a Jasindo health insurance as MA’s chief justices have. 

    “I empathize with the judges, they have to obtain a recommendation letter from a community health service (Puskesmas), as costs to go to a doctor is too huge,” said Hatta, who assured that he would strive to improve the healthcare services for Supreme Court employees. 

    The Supreme Court is currently eyeing to obtain a health insurance for its ad hoc judges and pushing for a regulatory change of healthcare services for all of its judges. 

    DEWI NURITA