Greenpeace: Odd-Even Traffic Policy Must be Monitored 24 Hours

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Petir Garda Bhwana

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  • An odd-even policy sign installed in Cawang, East Jakarta, on July 9, 2018. TEMPO/M Julnis Firmansyah

    An odd-even policy sign installed in Cawang, East Jakarta, on July 9, 2018. TEMPO/M Julnis Firmansyah

    TEMPO.CO, Jakarta - Greenpeace Indonesia’s climate and energy campaigner Bondan Ariyanu strongly suggests the Jakarta administration to constantly monitor the pollution level in real-time over city roads that apply the odd-even traffic policy for 24-hours.

    “Every odd-even traffic should be monitored in real-time for 24 hours to extract [valid] data,” said Bondan at the LBH Jakarta headquarters on Wednesday, August 28.

    The pollution monitoring equipment, Bondan argues, must cover a complete area over odd-even roads. He also argues that such equipment must be able to gain data telemetry from wind direction in order to get validated data regarding a location’s air quality.

    “Place as many monitoring equipments as possible and must not just be passive samplers. The real-time monitoring devices should calculate the trends for each hour,” says Bondan.

    As reported earlier, the Jakarta Administration under Governor’s Decree No.66/2019 decided to expand its odd-even traffic policy to 16 new road sections across the city which means there are now 25 roads where vehicles are restricted by the law.

    LANI DIANA WIJAYA