Canada Joins FAA Technical Review on Boeing 737-Max

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  • A 737 Max aircraft is pictured at the Boeing factory in Renton, Washington, U.S., March 27, 2019. The planemaker said the anti-stall system, which is believed to have repeatedly forced the nose lower in at least one of the accidents, in Indonesia last October, would only do so once per event after sensing a problem, giving pilots more control. REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson

    A 737 Max aircraft is pictured at the Boeing factory in Renton, Washington, U.S., March 27, 2019. The planemaker said the anti-stall system, which is believed to have repeatedly forced the nose lower in at least one of the accidents, in Indonesia last October, would only do so once per event after sensing a problem, giving pilots more control. REUTERS/Lindsey Wasson

    TEMPO.CO, Jakarta - The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said it would launch a new safety review of the Boeing 737 MAX. The technical review would be led by a top official from the US safety authority.

    Bisnis.com reported on Thursday, April 4, that the FAA had not disclosed who was taking part, but a Canadian government official said Canada would join.

    Meanwhile, Reuters said the FAA would form a joint-team of Authority Technical Reviews to ensure the safety of the Boeing 737 MAX. The team will examine the plane's anti-stall software which is suspected to be the cause of two fatal crashes involving 737-Max 8 planes in Indonesia and Ethiopia, which killed nearly 350 people.

    This review will be chaired by former National Transportation Safety Board chairman Christopher Hart. The FAA said the team of experts will conduct a comprehensive review of the certification of the automated flight control system on the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft.

    This review was carried out two days after the FAA and Boeing signaled that the 737 Max's grounding period would be extended. Since March 12, 2019, more than 300 Boeing 737 MAX aircraft have been grounded across the globe following the two fatal in Indonesia and Ethiopia over the course of 6 months.

    Last week, Boeing said they had reprogrammed the software on the 737 MAX planes to prevent erroneous data from triggering the anti-stall system. Last Monday, Boeing promised to send the software updates to the FAA in the coming weeks.

    BISNIS.COM