5 Important Travel Safety Tips in Disaster-prone Areas

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Markus Wisnu Murti

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  • Foreign tourists are witnessing the sunrise at Bromo Tengger National Park, Pasuruan, East Java, November 8, 2018. ANTARA FOTO/Oky Lukmansyah

    Foreign tourists are witnessing the sunrise at Bromo Tengger National Park, Pasuruan, East Java, November 8, 2018. ANTARA FOTO/Oky Lukmansyah

    TEMPO.CO, Jakarta - It comes as no surprise to anyone that Indonesia sits on active tectonic plates and huge slabs that are prone to disasters. But thinking about it, there is no single location on earth that is 100 percent free of disaster threats. 

    However, this should not stop travelers from embarking on an adventure across beautiful Indonesian tourist attractions as the National Disaster Mitigation Agency (BNPB) said that a disaster-prone area did not necessarily mean a no-go tourist spot. 

    Read: 5 Safety Tips for Traveling by Sea Transportation

    “As long as there are good disaster mitigation plans,” said BNPB spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho. 

    Here are 5 essential Travel safety tips at areas that are prone to disasters: 

    1. Research the place prior to visiting

    You should obviously be well-aware of the potential of a natural disaster striking the area you want to visit. List when these possible natural disasters might occur. While we’re at it, look into the possible diseases and dangerous animals that are there.

    1. Be informed of disaster mitigations

    Every natural disaster has its own unique mitigation plans. The BNPB has compiled them into a pocketbook that can be downloaded at their official website.

    1. Identify and study local evacuation routes

    You are urged to study and identify the safest evacuation route available in the area and how to access them. You are urged to map out the area yourself if there are no evacuation plans available in the area. 

    Read8 Tips for Your First Solo Traveling

    1. Remember important emergency numbers

    There are a few examples such as: 129 to reach a natural disaster emergency post, 118 and 119 for ambulance services, 115 to reach the search and rescue team (SAR), and 110 for police assistance. Keeping the phone numbers of one or two locals can also come in handy.

    1. First aid kit and emergency tools

    Always bring a simple, yet essential first aid kit and always store your wallet, phone, mobile chargers, flashlight, rope, and whistle in one bag that you carry. 

    TEMPO.CO