Maggots Help Indonesians Fight Food Waste at Home

18 December 2021 12:38 WIB

Black soldier fly lay eggs on narrow wood boards in the cage at a Biomagg office, in Depok, on the outskirts of Jakarta, Indonesia, November 23, 2021. Sinta and her family have been using the Magobox for the past few months, and receive new deliveries of maggot eggs every few weeks. After the maggots devour food waste, Sinta takes the valuable maggot excrement from the Magobox and sprinkles it onto her plants to use as organic compost. REUTERS/Ajeng Dinar Ulfiana

18 Desember 2021 00:00 WIB

A worker checks black soldier flies in a cage at a Biomagg office, in Depok, on the outskirts of Jakarta, Indonesia, November 23, 2021. When a batch of maggots reach the pupa stage after at least two weeks, she sells the pupas off to local business owners to use as livestock feed. REUTERS/Ajeng Dinar Ulfiana

18 Desember 2021 00:00 WIB

Maggots eat food waste at a Biomagg office in Depok, on the outskirts of Jakarta, Indonesia, November 23, 2021. Magobox was conceptualised by 28-year-old Indonesian entrepreneur Fathimah Himmatina at the end of 2020, and she only started selling the boxes in February of this year. She came up with the idea for Magobox while researching ways to earn extra income. REUTERS/Ajeng Dinar Ulfiana

18 Desember 2021 00:00 WIB

A worker feeds chickens with maggots at a Biomagg office in Depok, on the outskirts of Jakarta, Indonesia, November 23, 2021. Magobox currently orders its Black Soldier Fly maggot supplies from a farm operated by a partner company in Depok of West Java Province, where the Magoboxes are also assembled. REUTERS/Ajeng Dinar Ulfiana

18 Desember 2021 00:00 WIB

A Magobox starter kit is pictured in Jakarta, Indonesia, November 18, 2021. REUTERS/Ajeng Dinar Ulfiana

18 Desember 2021 00:00 WIB

A worker pours food waste for baby maggots at a Biomagg office in Depok, on the outskirts of Jakarta, Indonesia, November 23, 2021. REUTERS/Ajeng Dinar Ulfiana

18 Desember 2021 00:00 WIB