Children Learn Chess To Seek Escape from Nigeria's Slums

9 May 2021 09:10 WIB

Children play chess at a community palace in Makoko, Lagos, Nigeria May 5, 2021. A dozen children crowd around plastic tables in the Majidun neighbourhood of Lagos. Intently focused on plastic mats printed with chess boards, the children thoughtfully move pieces on the board as supervisors observe their moves. REUTERS/Temilade Adelaja

8 Mei 2021 00:00 WIB

Babatunde Onakoya, 26, teaches children to play chess at a community palace in Makoko, Lagos, Nigeria May 5, 2021. Babatunde Onakoya, 26, founded Chess in Slums Africa in 2018. Chess aided his rise from his own deprived childhood in Lagos. REUTERS/Temilade Adelaja

8 Mei 2021 00:00 WIB

Babatunde Onakoya, 26, teaches children to play chess at a community palace in Makoko Lagos, Nigeria May 5, 2021. Onakoya said he was driven by a conviction that Nigerian education is in crisis, with many children either out of school or not learning what he sees as useful survival skills. REUTERS/Temilade Adelaja

8 Mei 2021 00:00 WIB

Children play chess at a community palace in Makoko, Lagos, Nigeria May 5, 2021. Inspired by "Queen of Katwe", the 2016 film about a girl who escapes poverty in a Kenyan slum through chess, Omoyele hopes chess will help him, too. REUTERS/Temilade Adelaja

8 Mei 2021 00:00 WIB

A chess tutor teaches children chess at a community palace in Makoko, Lagos, Nigeria May 5, 2021. REUTERS/Temilade Adelaja

8 Mei 2021 00:00 WIB

Children play chess at a community palace in Makoko, Lagos, Nigeria May 5, 2021. REUTERS/Temilade Adelaja

8 Mei 2021 00:00 WIB