Jupiter (below) and Saturn (above) are pictured on the sky during the closest visible conjunction of them in 400 years, in La Linea de la Concepcion, southern Spain December 21, 2020. The evening sky over the Northern Hemisphere treated stargazers to a once-in-a-lifetime illusion on Monday as the solar system's two biggest planets appeared to meet in a celestial alignment that astronomers call the "Great Conjunction." REUTERS/Jon Nazca

John Galvan and his son Charlie use a telescope to view Jupiter and Saturn during a planetary conjuction, as they appear close together in a rare celestial event in Houston, Texas, U.S., December 21, 2020. Jupiter the brighter and larger of the pair has been gradually nearing Saturn in the sky for weeks as the two planets proceed around the sun, each in its own lane of an enormous celestial racetrack, said Henry Throop REUTERS/Callaghan O'Hare

Members of the Mota Velazco family use a telescope to view Jupiter and Saturn during a planetary conjunction, as they appear close together in a rare celestial event at the border crossing between Mexico and the United States in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico December 21, 2020. A conjunction of the two planets takes place about once every 20 years. But the last time Jupiter and Saturn came as close together in the sky as on Monday was in 1623. REUTERS/Jose Luis Gonzalez

Jupiter (L) and Saturn (R) are seen during the "Great Conjunction" where the two planets appear a tenth of a degree apart from one another, in this handout photo near Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S. December 21, 2020. The next Great Conjunction between the two planets though not nearly as close together comes in November 2040. NASA/Bill Ingalls/Handout via REUTERS

Thao Galvan holds her son Nathan while they view Jupiter and Saturn during a planetary conjuction, as they appear close together in a rare celestial event in Houston, Texas, U.S., December 21, 2020. REUTERS/Callaghan O'Hare

John Galvan sets up a telescope to view Jupiter and Saturn during a planetary conjuction, as they appear close together in a rare celestial event in Houston, Texas, U.S., December 21, 2020. REUTERS/Callaghan O'Hare