Alia Fares, 27, undergoes facial massage with Giant African land snails, which some claim boost collagen in the skin, at a centre in Amman, Jordan September 16, 2020. At a Jordanian beauty centre, 34-year-old Suheil Sweidan is offering slimy facial treatments that are not for the faint-hearted. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed

Alia Fares, 27, undergoes facial massage with Giant African land snails, which some claim boost collagen in the skin, at a centre in Amman, Jordan September 16, 2020. Some trace the use of snail slime to ancient Greece, where people would crush the animal and use it as a cure for skin lesions. More recently, products containing snail slime have become increasingly popular in countries like France, Thailand, Chile and Italy. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed

Alia Fares, 27, undergoes facial massage with Giant African land snails, which some claim boost collagen in the skin, at a centre in Amman, Jordan September 16, 2020. Doctors and dermatologists, however, say there has been no significant scientific research proving the benefit of the slime to the skin. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed

Alia Fares, 27, undergoes facial massage with Giant African land snails, which some claim boost collagen in the skin, at a centre in Amman, Jordan September 16, 2020. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed

Norma Rashia, 22, undergoes facial massage with Giant African land snails, which some claim boost collagen in the skin, at a centre in Amman, Jordan September 16, 2020. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed

Norma Rashia, 22, undergoes facial massage with Giant African land snails, which some claim boost collagen in the skin, at a centre in Amman, Jordan September 16, 2020. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed