Filipino artist Mary Mae Dacanay shows a portrait of Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte she made out of a leaf, in her home in Binan, Laguna, Philippines, September 1, 2020. Dacanay saw her redundancy as chance to enjoy her favourite pastime - art - but at first had difficulty sourcing materials in a country that has had in place some of the world's longest and strictest coronavirus measures. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez

Filipino artist Mary Mae Dacanay, who lost her job due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, makes portraits and illustrations out of leaves as a new source of income, in her home in Binan, Laguna, Philippines, September 1, 2020. Dacanay saw her redundancy as chance to enjoy her favourite pastime - art - but at first had difficulty sourcing materials in a country that has had in place some of the world's longest and strictest coronavirus measures. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez

Filipino artist Mary Mae Dacanay shows one of her leaf artworks, a tribute to COVID-19 front liners, in her home in Binan, Laguna, Philippines, September 1, 2020. After gaining thousands of followers on Facebook, Dacanay has sold hundreds of pieces of her "leaf art", each for about 400 pesos ($8.24). The exact price varies according to the level of detail in each piece. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez

Filipino artist Mary Mae Dacanay, who lost her job due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, makes portraits and illustrations out of leaves as a new source of income, in her home in Binan, Laguna, Philippines, September 1, 2020. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez

Some of Filipino artist Mary Mae Dacanay's leaf artworks are photographed in her home, in Binan, Laguna, Philippines, September 1, 2020. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez

Filipino artist Mary Mae Dacanay shows one of her leaf artworks, a tribute for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) front liners, in her home in Binan, Laguna, Philippines, September 1, 2020. REUTERS/Eloisa Lopez