George Khnaisser, whose mother was in labour at the moment of the Beirut port blast, lies on a changing table at the family home in Jal el-Dib, Lebanon, August 12, 2020. Stepping into the delivery room where his wife Emmanuelle was about to give birth, Edmond Khnaisser meant to capture their son's first moments on camera. REUTERS/Hannah McKay

Hospital staff works using torches while a baby named George is delivered, as the blast wave hit the hospital in Beirut, Lebanon August 4, 2020 in this picture obtained from social media. Instead, he recorded the instant the biggest blast in Lebanon's history sent whole windows crashing onto his 28 year-old wife's hospital bed. Edmound Khnaisser/via REUTERS

George, a boy that was born as the blast wave hit the hospital, is seen after birth in Beirut, Lebanon August 4, 2020 in this picture obtained from social media. "George is very special. He is the light in the darkness, a birth in wreckage," Edmond said, showing pictures of his son on the Instagram page he created for the boy they now call "miracle" baby George. Edmound Khnaisser/via REUTERS

Emmanuelle Lteif Khnaisser who was in labour at the moment of the Beirut port blast, holds her baby George at the family home in Jal el-Dib, Lebanon, August 12, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay

Emmanuelle Lteif Khnaisser, who was in labour at the moment of the Beirut port blast, holds her baby George at the family home in Jal el-Dib, Lebanon, August 12, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay

Emmanuelle Lteif Khnaisser, who was in labour at the moment of the Beirut port blast, passes her baby George to Chief Resident of Obstetrics at Saint George Hospital University Medical center, Stephanie Yacoub, so she checks on him at the family home in Jal el-Dib, Lebanon, August 12, 2020. REUTERS/Hannah McKay