A general view shows the damage following Tuesday's blast in Beirut's port area, Lebanon August 5, 2020. Lebanese rescue teams pulled out bodies and hunted for missing people on Wednesday from the wreckage caused by a massive warehouse explosion that sent a devastating blast wave across Beirut, killing at least 135. REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir

People walk past damaged buildings and vehicles following Tuesday's blast in Beirut's port area, Lebanon August 5, 2020. Up to a quarter of a million people were left without homes fit to live in, officials said, after shockwaves smashed building facades, sucked furniture out into streets and shattered windows miles inland. REUTERS/Carmen Yahchouchi

A man pushes his belongings along a street as he evacuates his damaged house, following Tuesday's blast in Beirut's port area, Lebanon August 5, 2020. The death toll was expected to rise from the blast, which officials blamed on a huge stockpile of highly explosive material stored for years in unsafe conditions at the port. REUTERS/Aziz Taher

Volunteers clean the streets following Tuesday's blast in Beirut's port area, Lebanon August 5, 2020. The explosion was the most powerful ever in Beirut, a city still scarred by civil war that ended three decades ago and reeling from an economic meltdown and a surge in coronavirus infections. REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir

Members of Turkey's Humanitarian Relief Foundation (IHH) help a local rescue team at the site of Tuesday's blast in Beirut's port area, Lebanon August 5, 2020. Humanitarian Relief Foundation (IHH)/Handout via REUTERS

A general view shows the damage at the site of Tuesday's blast in Beirut's port area, Lebanon August 5, 2020. REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir