Indigenous women shake hands with Makassan sailors during a welcome ceremony in Yirrkala, Northern Territory, Australia in this February 25, 2020 screen grab from Abu Hanifa Institute handout video. Muslim Makassan sailors from Indonesia regularly travelled thousands of kilometres across open sea to trade with Aboriginal people in Australia's far north. Abu Hanifa Institute/Handout via REUTERS

Indigenous people perform during a welcome ceremony as Makassan sailors responde in Yirrkala, Northern Territory, Australia in this February 25, 2020 screen grab from Abu Hanifa Institute handout video. Now, a voyage in a specially constructed replica boat has rekindled ties between the Makassans from Sulawesi island and the Yolngu clan in northeast Arnhem Land, providing a powerful message about belonging for young Australian Muslims. Abu Hanifa Institute/Handout via REUTERS

Sheikh Wesam Charkawi, co-founder Of Abu Hanifa Institute, reads a book in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia in this screen grab from a February 26, 2020 video. The project is the brainchild of the Abu Hanifa Institute, an organisation promoting education, identity and inclusiveness for Muslims in Sydney. REUTERS/REUTERS TV

Indigenous people walk towards Makassan sailors on a beach during a welcome ceremony in Yirrkala, Northern Territory, Australia in this screen grab from a February 25, 2020. Abu Hanifa Institute handout video. Abu Hanifa Institute/Handout via REUTERS

An undated handout photo from the Anu Hanifa Institute, of a traditional Indonesian 'Prau' vessel beig launched into the sea in Tana Beru, Sulawesi, Indonesia. Anu Hanifa Institure/Handout via REUTERS

An undated aerial handout photo of a traditional Indonesian 'Prau' vessel going through waters, from the Anu Hanifa Institute. Anu Hanifa Institure/Handout via REUTERS