Wednesday, 19 February 2020

Janine Davies, who set up Shoalhaven Bat Clinic, a care centre for flying foxes, in her home, holds a baby grey-headed flying fox in Bomaderry, Australia, January 20, 2020. It has been a busy summer for Janine Davies. From feeding bottles to cleaning the living space of the nearly 50 'babies' living with her, the part time flying-fox rescuer hardly gets a good night sleep these days. REUTERS/Angie Teo

A juvenile grey-headed flying fox drinks from a milk dispenser in a care centre set up at a home in Bomaderry, Australia January 20, 2020. Months of ranging forest fires has destroyed habitat of many endangered species in Australian forests, including the grey-headed flying-fox, whose population is already dwindling due to threats from land clearing activities. REUTERS/Angie Teo

A baby grey-headed flying fox with a 'pacifier' looks on in Bomaderry, Australia, January 20, 2020. With its wingspan spreading up to one meter, grey-headed flying-fox can travel up to 50 kilometres, and is considered as one of the biggest bats in Australia. REUTERS/Angie Teo

A juvenile grey-headed flying fox hangs in a care centre set up at a home in Bomaderry, Australia January 20, 2020. Australian government said it will provide up to 50 million Australian dollar ($34 million) in a wildlife recovery program focusing on the survival of the iconic native animals. REUTERS/Angie Teo

An adult grey-headed flying fox hangs in a care centre set up at a home in Bomaderry, Australia January 20, 2020. REUTERS/Angie Teo

Janine Davies, who set up Shoalhaven Bat Clinic, a care centre for flying foxes, in her home, looks at bats in Bomaderry, Australia, January 20, 2020. REUTERS/Angie Teo