A wallaby eats a carrot after NSW's National Parks and Wildlife Service staff air-dropped them in bushfire-stricken areas around Wollemi and Yengo National Parks, New South Wales, Australia January 11, 2020. Picture taken January 11, 2020. Wildlife officials in Australia began a food drop for animals in wildfire-ravaged forests in New South Wales on Friday (January 10), to help them survive in burnt-out land. NSW DPIE Environment, Energy and Science/Handout via REUTERS

NSW's National Parks and Wildlife Service staff load carrots and sweet potatoes to air-drop for animals in bushfire-stricken areas, in Newnes, Wollemi National Park, New South Wales, Australia January 10, 2020. Picture taken January 10, 2020. New South Wales authorities have airdropped over two tonnes of sweet potatoes and carrots in several national parks affected by the wildfires. NSW DPIE Environment, Energy and Science/Handout via REUTERS

NSW's National Parks and Wildlife Service staff fly with carrots and sweet potatoes before air-dropping them for animals in bushfire-stricken areas around Wollemi National Park, New South Wales, Australia January 10, 2020. Picture taken January 10, 2020. The food is meant for endangered species like the Brush-tailed Rock-wallaby - which typically survive the fires, but are left stranded with no food after fires burn off the vegetation they eat. NSW DPIE Environment, Energy and Science/Handout via REUTERS

NSW's National Parks and Wildlife Service staff drop and sweet potatoes from a helicopter for animals in bushfire-stricken areas around Wollemi National Park, New South Wales, Australia January 10, 2020. Picture taken January 10, 2020. "The wallabies were already under stress from the ongoing drought, making survival challenging for the wallabies without assistance," said New South Wales Environment Minister Matt Kean in a press release. NSW DPIE Environment, Energy and Science/Handout via REUTERS

A wallaby eats after NSW's National Parks and Wildlife Service staff air-dropped carrots and sweet potatoes in bushfire-stricken areas around Wollemi and Yengo National Parks, New South Wales, Australia January 11, 2020. Picture taken January 11, 2020. Helicopters loaded with boxes of food were dropped through bushlands and canyons. Wallabies were seen eating them off the ground. NSW DPIE Environment, Energy and Science/Handout via REUTERS

A wallaby eats after NSW's National Parks and Wildlife Service staff air-dropped carrots and sweet potatoes in bushfire-stricken areas around Wollemi and Yengo National Parks, New South Wales, Australia January 11, 2020. Picture taken January 11, 2020. More than 800 million native animals have been affected or killed in the blazes in New South Wales (NSW), the worst-hit state where about 5 million hectares of land has already burned, according to Professor Chris Dickman, an ecologist with Sydney University. NSW DPIE Environment, Energy and Science/Handout via REUTERS