Saturday, 18 January 2020

A man walks on the sea wall built in an area affected by land subsidence and rising sea levels, in northern coast of Jakarta, Indonesia, December 9, 2019. Picture taken December 9, 2019. Jakarta is slowly sinking due to an over-extraction of ground water causing subsidence, with rising sea levels making the threat of flooding even worse and pushing the city to come up with elaborate programmes to protect residents. REUTERS/Willy Kurniawan

Children walk by the sea wall built in an area affected by land subsidence and rising sea levels, in northern coast of Jakarta, Indonesia, December 9, 2019. Picture taken December 9, 2019. In 2014, the government announced a plan to build a giant seawall along the coast as part of a $40 billion project to protect the city until 2030. REUTERS/Willy Kurniawan

A man prepares to fish at the sea wall built in an area affected by land subsidence and rising sea levels, in northern coast of Jakarta, Indonesia, December 9, 2019. Picture taken December 9, 2019. The planned seawall, which was part of what had been dubbed the "Great Garuda" for its resemblance to the wing span of the mythical bird, included a stalled plan to build a new city on a string of reclaimed islands in Jakarta bay. REUTERS/Willy Kurniawan

A worker carries a bamboo stick at a crumbled sea wall in an area affected by land subsidence and rising sea levels, in northern coast of Jakarta, Indonesia, December 9, 2019. Picture taken December 9, 2019. The collapsed section is part of the first of three phases under the National Capital Integrated Coastal Development, which has come in for criticism from environmentalists concerned over the impact on the bay and for not fully addressing land subsidence. REUTERS/Willy Kurniawan

Kids play near a concrete sea wall at Muara Baru, an area affected by land subsidence and rising sea levels in northern coast of Jakarta, Indonesia, December 11, 2019. Picture taken December 11, 2019. Heri Andreas, an expert on land subsidence at the Bandung Institute of Technology, said land in Muara Baru was sinking at a rate of 12 cm (4.7 inches) per year, one of the fastest in Jakarta. REUTERS/Willy Kurniawan

Wooden fishing-boats are stranded near a water pump station at Muara Baru, an area affected by land subsidence and rising sea levels in northern coast of Jakarta, Indonesia, December 11, 2019. Picture taken December 11, 2019. Uncontrolled extraction of groundwater in Jakarta over the years has caused layers of rock and sediment to slowly pancake on top of each other. REUTERS/Willy Kurniawan