Tourists walk at the Manger Square outside the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank December 2, 2019. Picture taken December 2, 2019. As the Christmas decorations go up in Manger Square, Bethlehem is preparing for its best Christmas for two decades, the town's mayor and hoteliers say. REUTERS/Mussa Qawasma

Tourists pray inside the cave in the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank December 2, 2019. Picture taken December 2, 2019. Five new hotels are in the pipeline and existing ones are expanding. The town has even extended the opening hours of the Church of the Nativity, revered by Christians worldwide as the place of Jesus' birth. REUTERS/Mussa Qawasma

Tourists walk in Jacir Palace hotel in Bethlehem, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank December 2, 2019. Picture taken December 2, 2019. But even after three years of relative peace and prosperity, people are still nervous in the small Palestinian town, a few miles south of Jerusalem in the Israeli-occupied West Bank. REUTERS/Mussa Qawasma

A tourist is helped to wear a traditional Palestinian scarf in a souvenir shop in Bethlehem, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank December 2, 2019. Picture taken December 2, 2019. So dependent has Bethlehem become on tourist income that an upsurge of violence anywhere in the volatile Middle East - not just in its near vicinity - spells financial disaster, with nervous tour groups prone to cancelling months ahead. REUTERS/Mussa Qawasma

A tourist takes a selfie with a Palestinian man dressed as Santa Claus in Bethlehem, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank December 2, 2019. Picture taken December 2, 2019. Sitting in his municipality office overlooking the newly lit Christmas tree in Manger Square, Mayor Anton Salman said Bethlehem looked set to improve upon the 1.5 million visitors it received last year. REUTERS/Mussa Qawasma

A view shows the old city of Bethlehem, in the Israeli-occupied West Bank December 2, 2019. Picture taken December 2, 2019. The main bottleneck, he said, was the tiny front door of the Nativity church, through which pilgrims must crouch to enter. Once vast, it was reduced in size centuries ago by the Crusaders, then again during the Mamluk and Ottoman Turkish eras to prevent looters driving carts into the church. REUTERS/Mussa Qawasma