Thursday, 21 November 2019

Three month-old twin panda cubs are seen at Pairi Daiza wildlife park, a zoo and botanical garden in Brugelette, Belgium November 7, 2019. Belgian zoo's twin panda cubs were both in good health on Thursday, on the eve of their three-month anniversary. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir

Chinese zoo keeper Yang Liu examines one of the two three month-old twin panda cubs at Pairi Daiza wildlife park, a zoo and botanical garden in Brugelette, Belgium November 7, 2019. Currently referred to by the zoo as "Baby Boy" and "Baby Girl", the male and female cubs will be given a name when they reach 100 days, true to Chinese custom. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir

Chinese zoo keeper Yang Liu holds one of the two three month-old twin panda cubs at Pairi Daiza wildlife park, a zoo and botanical garden in Brugelette, Belgium November 7, 2019. An online survey was organised by the zoo to encourage the public to choose among a selection of potential traditional Chinese names picked by the Chinese Ambassador to Belgium, CAO Zhongming. Names include Tian Yi (The Joy of the Sky) for the female cub and Tian Jiao (The Pride of the Sky) for her brother. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir

One of the two three month-old twin panda cubs is seen at Pairi Daiza wildlife park, a zoo and botanical garden in Brugelette, Belgium November 7, 2019. The pandas are currently housed at the Pairi Daiza zoo in Brugelette, which has hosted female panda Hao Hao and her male partner Xing Hui since 2014 under an arrangement with the Chinese authorities. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir

Chinese zoo keeper Yang Liu weighs one of the two three month-old twin panda cubs at Pairi Daiza wildlife park, a zoo and botanical garden in Brugelette, Belgium November 7, 2019. Belgian zoo's twin panda cubs were both in good health on Thursday, on the eve of their three-month anniversary. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir

Three month-old twin panda cubs are seen at Pairi Daiza wildlife park, a zoo and botanical garden in Brugelette, Belgium November 7, 2019. Pandas are classed as an 'endangered' species by wildlife organisations across the globe. Adopted as the symbol for the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), they have in recent decades increasingly begun to symbolise endangered wildlife more generally. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir