Thursday, 21 November 2019

An old village near the ancient Hasankeyf fortress, which will be significantly submerged by the Ilisu Dam, is seen in the southeastern town of Hasankeyf, Turkey, October 3, 2019. In the ancient Turkish town of Hasankeyf, the Ozturk family are selling all the livestock that was their livelihood as they prepare to uproot to government-built housing across the Tigris River before the waters rise. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

An old cemetery is seen in Hasankeyf, which will be significantly submerged by the Ilisu Dam, by the Tigris river in the southeastern town of Hasankeyf, Turkey, October 3, 2019. They are among around 3,000 residents of the town who are being forced to leave by an Oct. 8 deadline to make way for the Ilisu Dam, a project two decades in the making that will generate electricity for southeast Turkey. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

Archeologists work in Hasankeyf, which will be significantly submerged by the Ilisu Dam, in southeastern Turkey, October 3, 2019. They are among around 3,000 residents of the town of Hasankeyf who are being forced to leave to make way for a new dam. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

General view of Hasankeyf, which will be significantly submerged by the Ilisu Dam, with the new Hasankeyf in the background, in the southeastern town of Hasankeyf, Turkey, October 3, 2019. Eight historic relics have been moved to the new town, including a massive tomb, an ancient Turkish bath and a historic mosque. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

An old cemetery is seen in Hasankeyf, which will be significantly submerged by the Ilisu Dam, with the new Hasankeyf in the background in the southeastern town of Hasankeyf, Turkey, October 3, 2019. REUTERS/Sertac Kayar

An aerial view of Celikkoy, which will be significantly submerged by the Ilisu Dam, near the southeastern town of Hasankeyf, Turkey, October 4, 2019. REUTERS/Mehmet Emin Caliskan