A camp staff feeds Ayeyar Sein, a four-month-old baby elephant who lost her parents to poachers, after her daily wound cleaning in Wingabaw Elephant Camp, Bago, Myanmar, September 30, 2019. Picture taken September 30, 2019. Baby elephant Ayeyar Sein trumpets impatiently as a vet prepares her milk bottle and walks cautiously, her front left leg in a splint made of bamboo and cloth bandages. REUTERS/Ann Wang

A camp staff comforts Ayeyar Sein, a four-month-old baby elephant who lost her parents to poachers, during her daily wound cleaning in Wingabaw Elephant Camp, Bago, Myanmar, September 30, 2019. Picture taken September 30, 2019. The four-month-old calf was rescued from a hunter's snare trap in the forest of Myanmar's southwest Ayeyarwaddy region last month and is now being looked after by staff at the Wingabaw elepant sanctuary, an hour's drive northeast of Yangon. REUTERS/Ann Wang

Staff members prepare Ayeyar Sein, a four-month-old baby elephant who lost her parents to poachers, for her daily wound cleaning in Wingabaw Elephant Camp, Bago, Myanmar, September 30, 2019. Picture taken September 30, 2019. "When she arrived at the camp last month, her leg was terribly sore", said Than Naing Oo, the camp veterinarian, as he cleaned the injury. "Now she is getting better as we treat her with medicine twice a day." REUTERS/Ann Wang

Ayeyar Sein, a four-month-old baby elephant who lost her parents to poachers, rests after her daily wound cleaning in Wingabaw Elephant Camp, Bago, Myanmar, September 30, 2019. Picture taken September 30, 2019. Than Naing Oo said Ayeyar Sein's parents were nowhere to be seen near the trap and were most likely killed by poachers. Poachers kill elephants for their tusks and skin, which are used to make jewellery and traditional medicine, among other things. REUTERS/Ann Wang

Ayeyar Sein, a four-month-old baby elephant who lost her parents to poachers, rests after her daily wound cleaning in Wingabaw Elephant Camp, Bago, Myanmar, September 30, 2019. Picture taken September 30, 2019. Officials named the four-month-old calf Ayeyar Sein in accordance with the tradition of giving orphans the first name of the state where they are found. REUTERS/Ann Wang

A staff member feeds milk to Ayeyar Sein in Wingabaw Elephant Camp, Bago, Myanmar, September 27, 2019. Wingabaw elephant camp is a government-owned shelter and 20 elephants rescued from similar situations are currently kept there. Eight are orphaned baby elephants. REUTERS/Ann Wang