Thursday, 14 November 2019

A motorboat crosses the Martapura River, which is shrouded in haze in Banjarmasin, South Kalimantan, Indonesia on Thursday, September 12, 2019. Authorities in Indonesia's West Kalimantan province said on Thursday they had tightened rules to try and curb slash-and-burn clearances by plantation companies - a practice linked to a wave of forest fires. ANTARA FOTO/Bayu Pratama S

Motorists wear protective masks when crossing a road shrouded in haze in Banjarmasin, South Kalimantan, Indonesia on Thursday, September 12, 2019. Blazes have ripped through six Indonesian provinces in the past month, including West Kalimantan which borders Malaysia on the island of Borneo. ANTARA FOTO/Bayu Pratama S

A member of forest fire brigade tries to extinguish peatland fires at a palm plantation in Banjarbaru, south Kalimantan, Indonesia on September 11, 2019. Some of Indonesia's neighbours, including Malaysia, have called for action, saying the fires are spreading pollution over their borders - an accusation dismissed by Jakarta. ANTARA FOTO/Bayu Pratama S

A ship crosses the Kapuas River shrouded in haze in Pontianak, West Kalimantan, Indonesia on Thursday, September 12, 2019. The region last month issued rules allowing it to suspend permits for three years if a company is negligent about fires, or five years if it deliberately uses fire to clear forests, according to its website. ANTARA FOTO/Jessica Helena Wuysang

A commercial plane landed at Syamsudin Noor Airport, which was shrouded in haze in Banjarbaru, South Kalimantan, Indonesia on Wednesday, September 11, 2019. The fires, which government data shows have burnt an area of 328,722 hectares (812,290 acres) this year, are often started by farmers to clear land for palm oil and pulp plantations. ANTARA FOTO/Bayu Pratama S

A number of ships cross the Kapuas River which is shrouded in haze in Pontianak, West Kalimantan, Indonesia on Thursday, September 12, 2019. The affected regions have declared states of emergency. The central government has sent more than 9,000 personnel to help tackle the blazes, dropped water from helicopters and used cloud seeding to encourage rain. ANTARA FOTO/Jessica Helena Wuysang