Monday, 23 September 2019

Officials record and examine cygnets and swans during the annual census of the Queen's swans, known as 'Swan Upping', along the River Thames near London, Britain, July 15, 2019. The annual census of the Queen's swan population started on the River Thames on Monday. The ancient ceremony dates back to the 12th century when the English crown first claimed ownership of all mute swans. REUTERS/Toby Melville

David Barber, The Queen's Swan Marker holds a cygnet as officials record and examine cygnets and swans during the annual census of the Queen's swans, known as 'Swan Upping', along the River Thames in London, Britain July 15, 2019. The annual "Swan Upping" ceremony, an 800-year-old tradition of counting the swans owned by Britain's Queen Elizabeth. REUTERS/Toby Melville

Officials record and examine cygnets and swans during the annual census of the Queen's swans, known as 'Swan Upping', along the River Thames near London, Britain, July 15, 2019. The ancient ceremony dates back to the 12th century when the English crown first claimed ownership of all mute swans. REUTERS/Toby Melville

Officials record and examine cygnets and swans during the annual census of the Queen's swans, known as 'Swan Upping', along the River Thames near London, Britain, July 15, 2019. REUTERS/Toby Melville

Officials record and examine cygnets and swans during the annual census of the Queen's swans, known as 'Swan Upping', along the River Thames in London, Britain July 15, 2019. REUTERS/Toby Melville

A swan reacts as officials row closer to record and examine cygnets and swans during the annual census of the Queen's swans, known as 'Swan Upping', along the River Thames near London, Britain, July 15, 2019. REUTERS/Toby Melville