Wednesday, 11 December 2019

A solar eclipse is observed at Coquimbo, Chile, July 2, 2019. A solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between the Earth and the sun, plunging the planet into darkness. It happens only rarely in any given spot across the globe. REUTERS/Rodrigo Garrido

People observe a solar eclipse at Incahuasi, Chile, July 2, 2019. Hundreds of thousands of tourists scattered across the north Chilean desert on Tuesday to experience a rare, and irresistible combination for astronomy buffs: a total eclipse of the sun viewed from beneath the world's clearest skies. REUTERS/Juan Jose Gonzalez Galaz

A person gestures while observing a solar eclipse at Incahuasi, Chile, July 2, 2019. The region had not seen an eclipse since 1592, according to the Chilean Astronomy Society. The next one is expected in 2165. REUTERS/Juan Jose Gonzalez Galaz

A person observes a solar eclipse at Coquimbo, Chile, July 2, 2019. Clear skies dominated from the South American country's northern border with Peru south to the capital of Santiago, where office workers poured from buildings to catch a glimpse of the phenomenon. REUTERS/Rodrigo Garrido

A solar eclipse is observed at Coquimbo, Chile, July 2, 2019. REUTERS/Rodrigo Garrido