Saturday, 14 December 2019

Ida Daniela Pouadjeu (L), 16, a soccer player, attends her training session with her U17 team, who are amongst the first wave of girls being trained by professional coaches at the Rails Foot Academy at the Rail's field in Yaounde, Cameroon May 2, 2019. Pouadjeu is angry about people's attitude towards female soccer players. An orphan, she was brought up by her aunt who once warned her against playing football saying she would end up sleeping with all the girls at the academy. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

Gaelle Dule Asheri, 17, a soccer player, who is amongst the first wave of girls being trained by professional coaches at the Rails Foot Academy (RFA), attends a training session of the female U17 team at the RFA field in Yaounde, Cameroon, May 1, 2019. Asheri never gave up her dream despite strong opposition from her mother who feared she would lose her daughter to a "men's game". REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

Gaelle Dule Asheri (C), 17, a soccer player, who is amongst the first wave of girls being trained by professional coaches at the Rails Foot Academy (RFA), challenges U15 team players during their friendly match in the RFA field in Yaounde, Cameroon, May 4, 2019. Asheri never gave up her dream despite strong opposition from her mother who feared she would lose her daughter to a "men's game". REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

Girl soccer players from U17, who are amongst the first wave of girls being trained by professional coaches at the Rails Foot Academy (RFA), attend a training session at the RFA field in Yaounde, Cameroon, May 1, 2019. Gaelle Enganamouit, the star player of Cameroon's team known as the Indomitable Lionesses, one of three African teams to qualify for the Women's World Cup in June, was the brains behind RFA - the West African country's first female soccer academy. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

Emmanuel Eteme Biolo, a girls' U17 team coach, talks with his team during half-time of the match at the Rail Foot Academy field in Yaounde, Cameroon, May 4, 2019. The academy currently trains around 70 girls, most of whom come from poor backgrounds and would otherwise not be able to afford even their own soccer boots, said Biolo. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra

Gaelle Dule Asheri, 17, a soccer player, who is amongst the first wave of girls being trained by professional coaches at the Rails Foot Academy, plays football with her friends outside her house in Yaounde, Cameroon, May 3, 2019. REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra