A K-pop applicant performs at an audition in Tokyo, Japan, February 23, 2019. The influx of Japanese talent that is reshaping the K-pop industry comes at a time of increasingly bitter political acrimony between the two countries that has damaged diplomatic ties. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-hoon

Japanese Yuuka Hasumi, 17, and Yuho Wakamatsu, 15, also from Japan, who want to become K-pop stars, attend a Korean language class in Seoul, South Korea, March 12, 2019. Hasumi put high school in Japan on hold and flew to South Korea in February to try her chances at becoming a K-pop star, even if that means long hours of vocal and dance training, no privacy, no boyfriend, and even no phone. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

Japanese Yuho Wakamatsu, 15, who wants to become a K-pop star, takes photographs of Japanese Yuuka Hasumi, 17, during a training session in Seoul, South Korea, March 12, 2019.That the tension has done little to dent the K-pop craze among Japanese youth, and the willingness by Korean agencies to take on Japanese talent. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji

Nao Niitsu, 19, a college freshman from Tokyo, who wants to be a K-pop star, practices dancing to K-pop songs in her room in Tokyo, Japan, March 20, 2019. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

Japanese Yuuka Hasumi, 17, and Ibuki Ito, 17, also from Japan, who want to become K-pop stars, perform during their street performance in Hongdae area of Seoul, South Korea, March 21, 2019. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji