Officials take a look as they inspect the newly recovered debris of crashed Lion Air flight JT610 at Tanjung Priok port in Jakarta. The pilots of a doomed Lion Air Boeing 737 MAX scrambled through a handbook to understand why the jet was lurching downwards in the final minutes before it hit the water killing all 189 people on board. TEMPO/Hilman Fathurrahman W

Indonesian rescue team members carry newly recovered debris of crashed Lion Air flight JT610 at Tanjung Priok port in Jakarta. Investigators examining the Indonesian crash are considering how a computer ordered the plane to dive in response to data from a faulty sensor and whether the pilots had enough training to respond appropriately to the emergency, among other factors. TEMPO/M. Taufan Rengganis

Workers load up recovered belongings believed to be from Lion Air flight JT610 onto a truck at Tanjung Priok port in Jakarta. It is the first time the voice recorder contents from the Lion Air flight have been made public. The three sources discussed them on condition of anonymity. TEMPO/Muhammad Hidayat

Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR) of a Lion Air JT610 that crashed into Tanjung Karawang sea is seen inside a special container after it was found under the sea. The captain was at the controls of Lion Air flight JT610 when the nearly new jet took off from Jakarta, and the first officer was handling the radio, according to a preliminary report issued in November. TEMPO/Subekti

Workers load up recovered debris from Lion Air flight JT610 onto a truck at Tanjung Priok port in Jakarta. TEMPO/Muhammad Hidayat