Thursday, 17 October 2019

Firefighters are seen inside a burnt electrical substation after a massive blackout in Caracas, Venezuela March 11, 2019. Venezuela's opposition-run congress on Monday declared a "state of alarm" over a five-day power blackout that has crippled the OPEC member country's oil exports and left millions of citizens scrambling to find food and water. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso

A resident looks at a burnt electrical substation after a massive blackout in Caracas, Venezuela, March 11, 2019. Much of Venezuela remained without power on Monday, although electricity had largely returned to the capital of Caracas following an outage that began on Thursday and which President Nicolas Maduro has called an act of U.S.-backed sabotage. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso

A man closes the gate to a burnt electrical substation after a massive blackout in Caracas, Venezuela March 11, 2019. The outage has added to discontent in a country already suffering from hyperinflation and a political crisis after opposition leader Juan Guaido assumed the interim presidency in January after declaring Maduro's 2018 re-election a fraud. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso

A man takes pictures of a burnt electrical substation after a massive blackout in Caracas, Venezuela March 11, 2019. "Nothing is normal in Venezuela, and we will not allow this tragedy to be considered normal, which is why we need this decree of a state of alarm," said Guaido, who heads the legislature, during the session on Monday. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso

Smoke is seen on top of a burnt electrical substation after a massive blackout in Caracas, Venezuela March 11, 2019. The constitution allows the president to declare states of alarm amid catastrophes that "seriously compromise the security of the nation," but does not explicitly say what practical impact such a declaration would have. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso

Residents look at a burned electrical substation after a massive blackout in Caracas, Venezuela March 11, 2019. During the legislative session, Guaido called for a halt in shipments of oil to Maduro's political ally Cuba, which has received discounted crude from Venezuela for nearly two decades. The deals have drawn scrutiny from the opposition and its allies abroad as Venezuela's economic crisis worsened. REUTERS/Carlos Jasso