Saturday, 7 December 2019

A Maasai Moran from Mbirikani Manyatta, throws a javelin as he competes in the 2018 Maasai Olympics at the Sidai Oleng Wildlife Sanctuary, at the base of Mt. Kilimanjaro, near the Kenya-Tanzania border in Kimana, Kajiado, Kenya December 15, 2018. Young Kenyan warriors are no longer pursuing lions to show off their hunting prowess and bravery, they are competing for cash prizes in javelin throwing at the Maasai Olympics instead. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya

Maasai Morans compete during the 5000m race in the 2018 Maasai Olympics at the Sidai Oleng Wildlife Sanctuary, at the base of Mt. Kilimanjaro, near the Kenya-Tanzania border in Kimana, Kajiado, Kenya December 15, 2018. For Kenyan middle distance runner David Rudisha, who holds the world record for 800 metres, the Maasai Olympics are helping to ensure lions remain part of the country's future. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya

A Maasai moran throws a traditional club, known as rungu, during the 2018 Maasai Olympics at the Sidai Oleng Wildlife Sanctuary, at the base of Mt. Kilimanjaro, near the Kenya-Tanzania border in Kimana, Kajiado, Kenya December 15, 2018. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya

Tipape Lekatoo, a Maasai Moran from Mbirikani Manyatta, competes in a traditional high-jump event during the 2018 Maasai Olympics at the Sidai Oleng Wildlife Sanctuary, at the base of Mt. Kilimanjaro, near the Kenya-Tanzania border in Kimana, Kajiado, Kenya December 15, 2018. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya

Maasai Moran athletes have their breakfast before the 2018 Maasai Olympics at the Sidai Oleng Wildlife Sanctuary, at the base of Mt. Kilimanjaro, near the Kenya-Tanzania border in Kimana, Kajiado, Kenya December 15, 2018. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya

Maasai women pose for a photograph at the Mbirikani Manyatta at the base of Mt. Kilimanjaro, near the Kenya-Tanzania border in Kimana, Kajiado, Kenya December 14, 2018. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya