Saturday, 14 December 2019

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 18, 2018. When Reuters photographer Lucas Jackson headed to Greenland in June, he traveled with a heavy, oversized rolling bag containing a crucial piece of equipment to document climate change. Jackson, one of a handful of Reuters photographers licensed to operate a drone, spent seven rainy days camped alongside Greenland's Helheim glacier, near the small seaside village of Tasiilaq. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. Drones are an emerging tool for newsgathering, but they potentially pose several legal and ethical challenges, including the violation of privacy. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 19, 2018. Until now, Reuters has used drones only on rare occasions. But Greenland provided a perfect opportunity since a drone is inexpensive to operate. By contrast, renting a helicopter can cost thousands of dollars per day. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. The drone offered Jackson the ideal way to procure bird's eye shots and video of icebergs and glaciers as well as footage of scientists monitoring rising sea levels, without disrupting their research. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. According to our rules, drones must be used in daylight hours, at specific altitudes and at a safe distance from an airport. As a result, our use of drones so far has been limited. Reuters journalists still typically take overhead shots from helicopters. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 18, 2018. However, drones can shoot images at a lower elevation, often offering more granular details since they can hover in one spot without much movement. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson