Saturday, 7 December 2019

A large crevasse forms near the calving front of the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 22, 2018. Perched on a cliff above Greenlands Helheim glacier, I tried calling my wife in New York on a satellite phone. Before I could leave a message, an explosion broke the arctic silence. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Earth Science Flight Programs Director at NASA, Eric Ianson, looks out at the Greenland ice sheet while inside a NASA Gulfstream III flying above Greenland to measure loss to the country's ice sheet as part of the Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) research mission, March 13, 2018. More explosions followed. I ran across a muddy tundra to a video camera on a tripod overlooking the glacier and ripped off the trash bag I had used to protect it. I hit record as fast as I could focus. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Meltwater pools are seen on top of the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 19, 2018. The popping sounds morphed into a low rumble. Over the next half hour, the ice broke apart and a four-mile wide chunk tumbled into the sea in a process called calving - one rarely witnessed on this scale. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Safety officer Brian Rougeux uses a drill to install antennas for scientific instruments that will be left on top of the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 19, 2018. As a Reuters photographer, I have captured erupting volcanoes, the aftermath of hurricanes and tornadoes, and war, but I have never felt so small. It was a poignant end to a months-long project examining climate change in Greenland. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Student Febin Magar watches as safety officer Brian Rougeux burns leftover wood while working in a science camp on the side of the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 20, 2018. To find out, we turned to a team of scientists flying out of Iceland affiliated with a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) project named Oceans Melting Greenland. They aim to understand how warming oceans are melting the islands ice from below. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

GPS tracking equipment is left on top of the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 19, 2018. We also spent time with New York University oceanographer David Holland, who was there on a separate research project and also witnessed the Helheim glacier calving. I realized the scale of this work while aboard a NASA research aircraft with principal investigator Joshua Willis and other scientists, at 40,000 feet (12,192 metres), as we looked out at the seemingly infinite white horizon of the Greenland ice cap. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson