Workers work at the construction site of a new apartment in Jakarta, Indonesia, July 27, 2016. Indonesians who have stashed billions of dollars abroad over the years can now bring their hoard safely back home - literally, to a newly bought condo. REUTERS/Iqro Rinaldi

A worker sits atop steel bars at the construction site of a new apartment in Jakarta, Indonesia, July 27, 2016. That's the pitch from PT Intiland Development Tbk and other Indonesian property developers that aim to grab a slice of at least $30 billion expected to be brought back to Southeast Asia's biggest economy under a tax amnesty programme implemented last month. REUTERS/Iqro Rinaldi

A woman holds her baby as she walks in front of a billboard of a new apartment in Jakarta, Indonesia, July 26, 2016. Intiland has launched a new marketing campaign featuring a bird soaring above high-rise towers, with the slogan: "Buy property with tax amnesty." REUTERS/Iqro Rinaldi

The sun sets behind a construction project in central Jakarta, Indonesia July 12, 2016. Indonesia will impose a 2-5 percent tax for assets brought back by March 2017 in return for a pardon for past evasions. The funds must be kept in Indonesia for three years and can be invested in several ways, including direct purchases of property. REUTERS/Darren Whiteside

A view of a construction project in central Jakarta, Indonesia August 2, 2016. Indonesians who have stashed billions of dollars abroad over the years can now bring their hoard safely back home - literally, to a newly bought condo. REUTERS/Darren Whiteside

A view of the buildings in Central Jakarta, Indonesia August 2, 2016. That's the pitch from PT Intiland Development Tbk and other Indonesian property developers that aim to grab a slice of at least $30 billion expected to be brought back to Southeast Asia's biggest economy under a tax amnesty programme implemented last month. REUTERS/Darren Whiteside


  • Tax